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  • finding Nodal point

    Wondering if there is a chart for setting for different camera lens set ups. I have a nodal ninja 3ii. One camera i need settings for D850 with Tamaron 15-30 2.8. I also need settings for a D7000 with Nikon 10-24 3.5. If anyone is using these set ups and have the settings I would be grateful. I am struggling finding on my own.. Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by TonyM View Post
    Wondering if there is a chart for setting for different camera lens set ups. I have a nodal ninja 3ii. One camera i need settings for D850 with Tamaron 15-30 2.8. I also need settings for a D7000 with Nikon 10-24 3.5. If anyone is using these set ups and have the settings I would be grateful. I am struggling finding on my own.. Thanks
    Hi Tony

    Such databases have existed in the past but were often full of errors, approximation ! It's always better to search Nodal Point for your specific camera/lens combination by yourself. It's not a complicated process (it's fully documented in the NN3 documentation: http://www.nodalninja.com/Manuals/NN3_USER_MANUAL.pdf). This way you'll "loose" few minutes to find a good nodal point instead of using generic settings. The few minutes "lost" in the process will be a big time saver for stitching pictures (more nodal point setup is done correctly on head, easier goes the stiching process).
    Side note: more objects are narrow of camera more nodal point setup has to be accurate ! If you are shooting a panorama in a bathroom you'll need a perfect nodal point setup ! If you shoot at top of Mont Blanc, an approximate nodal point won't be a problem ;)
    Retired Nodal Ninja Distributor
    Blog: http://www.skivr.com

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    • #3
      Hello Tony,

      The Nodal Point is related to the lens so the camera body is not relevant, and as Vincen states, is a matter of scale - the closer the subject the more accurately you need to establish it.

      There are various ways of determining the Nodal Point (No Parallax Point - NPP) as shown on:
      https://www.panoramic-photo-guide.co.uk/finding-the-nodal-point.html
      http://www.hugh360.co.uk/measurement/finding-the-nodal-point-of-a-lens/ (A simple method ...)
      http://michel.thoby.free.fr/Locate%20point%20nodal.html
      https://www.red-door.co.uk/pages/productpages/nodal-ninja-parallax-nodal-point.html
      Basically lining up two objects so they are still in line when rotating the camera left and right.

      Note that the NPP changes as you change the focal length of a zoom lens so you really need to decide what focal length you are going to use and find the NPP for that focal length.
      Looking towards the bottom of http://www.hugh360.co.uk/measurement/finding-the-nodal-point-of-a-lens/ will show you examples of the NPP for various lenses.
      It also changes with the focus, but wide angle lenses, especially fisheye, have such a large depth of field that the the lens can be set to one focus (usually infinity) and locked there using electrical tape or similar.

      Feel free to post further questions.

      Hope this helps, Hugh.
      Last edited by Hugh; 2 weeks ago.

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      • #4
        Thank you for the responses. I see what your points are here. I have not done a pano for some time and remember last time struggling with the manual set up. The focal point issue makes total sense and is something that was not brought to reason last time. I shoot real estate but very seldom get requests for panos. So if I understand correctly, the set up just needs consistency with the FOCAL LENGTH but does not matter how far away your FOCUS Point is? Does it matter how far away the vertical lines are away when setting up? Obviously I will be shooting wide, probably 12-14mm F11 so focus is not usually a concern. Side note... I am dyslexic so videos are by far my best learning tool. Thank you again! Tony

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        • #5
          From your message I guess that you will be shooting in rooms so I would suggest shooting at the widest angle to minimize the number of shots (i.e. 12 mm with the Nikon 12-24 mm on the D7000 and 15 mm with the Tamron 15-30 mm on the D850) and choosing the camera/lens that gives you the least amount of shots.
          You could try the Nikon 12-24 on the D850 as this will probably give you the least number of shots.

          As you will be at f11 I would suggest keeping the lens focused at infinity.

          It should not matter how far away the vertical lines (room corners?) are away when setting up, although I would try and get as central as possible, but this is not always achievable.
          I shoot with a D800 and Nikon 10.5 mm lens and have been in some quite small rooms such as the bathroom in Lantern House (http://360hugh.co.uk/panormas/proper...se-ilfracombe/).

          Note that once you have found the NPP for the Nikon 12-24 at 12 mm it will be the same for both bodies.

          I have noticed you comment about video and you could try looking at these:
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJZE1NaeXGI
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxUHDwqicXk

          If you look at the last item on http://www.hugh360.co.uk/measurement...int-of-a-lens/ you will see a diagram for a Sigma 12-24 mm at 12 mm so this should give you a good guide to where the NPP will be at 12 mm on the Nikon 12-24 mm.

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