10x1 meter pano
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: 10x1 meter pano

Share/Bookmark
  1. 10x1 meter pano

    #1

    Hello,

    I have bought an NN5 while ago but never used it.
    I have a Nikon D3 with several lenses and would like which one would you recommend to make a 10x1meter pano of a city from a lighthouse.

    The lenses I have are :
    14-24 2.8
    24-70 2.8
    70-200 2.8
    and a 80-400 5.6

    Also could you tell me where could I find the nodal points for the 70-200 @ 200 and the 80-400 @ 300 and 400.

    All the best
  2. #2

    To make any sensible calculations, one needs to know the angle of view of the scene to be captured and the required resolution of the final print (pixels per inch - or ppi). For high quality prints, 300ppi is often recommended, but really it depends on the viewing distance. Is the large panorama to be viewed from very close up (30cm, say) or will it be viewed only from 1-2m perhaps?
    .
    John
  3. #3
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Hong Kong
    Posts: 2,476

    Quote Originally Posted by saadtazi View Post
    Hello,

    I have bought an NN5 while ago but never used it.
    I have a Nikon D3 with several lenses and would like which one would you recommend to make a 10x1meter pano of a city from a lighthouse.

    The lenses I have are :
    14-24 2.8
    24-70 2.8
    70-200 2.8
    and a 80-400 5.6

    Also could you tell me where could I find the nodal points for the 70-200 @ 200 and the 80-400 @ 300 and 400.

    All the best
    10m x 1m is 393.70" x 39.37". If the print is at 240ppi, you need 94488x 9448.8 sq. pixels. if you shoot at 30% overlap, you need acquire a total source resolution of 134983 x 13498 sq. pixels. D3 has 2832 x 4256 sq. pixels, 134983/2832=47.6. So you need 47-48 shots in horizontal direction. 13498/4256=3.2. So you need 3-4 shots in vertical direction. Note that this calculation is just an approximate.
    To work out the focal length of lens, you need to know the angle of view of your scene.
    This post may be of some help.
    http://www.panoguide.com/forums/qna/4082/


    Nick
    Last edited by nick fan; 12-04-2011 at 09:30 PM.



    Fanotec
    We listen. We try harder.
  4. #4

    Hello,

    Thank you all for your insights.
    The idea is to print the image for people to get as close as they want to see thenlevel of details. I am suppposed to shoot next week depending of the weather of course.

    Nick,
    When I use the NN5, which ring should I use to get the overlap if I go with the 400mm ?

    Thanks
  5. #5

    When a camera image is loaded into PTGui and you set the lens type to rectilinear and focal length to 400mm on the Lens Details tab, the field of view (portrait orientation) displays as 3.437 degrees. With no overlap at all, you would need 360/3.437 shots to cover the full horizontal 360 degrees view - i.e. 105 shots. If you want 30% overlap, then you would need to rotate the camera in increments of 70% of 3.437 degrees - i.e. 2.406 degrees. To cover the full 360 degrees would therefore need 360/2.406=150 shots. However, there are no detent rings available that offer anything close to 2.4 degree increments. The smallest available will be 15 or 18 degrees.
    .
    For a detent interval of 18 degrees, the camera image would need to cover 18/70 * 100 = 25.74 degrees to allow for 30% overlap. Entering that fov into PTGui shows a focal length of 52.52mm. So you would need to use a 50mm lens.
    .
    John
  6. #6

    Quote Originally Posted by saadtazi View Post
    Hello,

    When I use the NN5, which ring should I use to get the overlap if I go with the 400mm ?
    The numbers can be confusing at times - here's an image I shot at 400mm using full frame.
    http://gigapan.org/gigapans/44159

    Not impressive quality by any stretch and had severe dirt on the sensor (lots of dust in Arizona). Also at longer focal lengths the heat waves radiating off the ground add to distortion. I shot this using D3x w/80-400mm lens on NN5 w/RD16 - the gigapixel was done as test image only.
    On RD16 take out detent plunger knob and use reference marks on rotator which are every 2.5 degrees. You will appreciate the fluid movement of the rotator and once you get the hang of it the image taking process goes quite quickly. I suggest taking images 10 at a time with slight pause so you don't loose track of count. You will notice some banding (vignetting) - this is because not enough overlap was used. The images would have yielded less banding at 375mm using the 2.5 degree marks.

    Image size: 10.2 Gigapixels
    Panorama size: 10227 megapixels (280700 x 36436 pixels)
    Input images: 1067 (97 columns by 11 rows)
    Field of view: 160.1 degrees wide by 20.8 degrees high

    Note if you exceed 300,000 pixels wide you won't be able to import into Photoshop for editing.
    Bill
  7. #7

    Bill,

    URL correct?

    Oops...

    We couldn't find the page you were looking for... This file might have been moved or no longer exist or the URL is slightly incorrect.

    To get you back on track, we suggest one of the following:

    Home
    View Gigapans
    Contact us
    Site Map

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •