Problems using the NN4

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  1. Problems using the NN4

    #1

    I'm still having problem using the NN4 and a Canon 7D + 17-55 zoom and setting the position of the knob/camera holder on the upper arm.

    When I change the zooming on the lens, I have to change the position along the arm: 17mm -> 75, 28mm -> 60 and so on.

    When I unscrew the knob, it doesn't unscrew, instead it goes backward then eventually there's enough space to remove the holder from the guide on the upper arm. Only then, I can move it to the new position.

    What am I doing wrong?

    Thanks
  2. #2
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    Location: Hong Kong
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    Quote Originally Posted by foto-biz View Post
    I'm still having problem using the NN4 and a Canon 7D + 17-55 zoom and setting the position of the knob/camera holder on the upper arm.

    When I change the zooming on the lens, I have to change the position along the arm: 17mm -> 75, 28mm -> 60 and so on.

    When I unscrew the knob, it doesn't unscrew, instead it goes backward then eventually there's enough space to remove the holder from the guide on the upper arm. Only then, I can move it to the new position.

    What am I doing wrong?

    Thanks
    the cork on the camera plate has some stickiness. After unwinding the the knob for one turn, press it against the rail using your thumb while bracing the upper rail with your other fingers. Do so with just one hand only so that it will not cause any undue stress on the rails.
    let me know if you still have any issue.

    nick
    Last edited by nick fan; 09-23-2011 at 07:56 PM.



    Fanotec
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  3. #3

    Yes, I'm still having an issue with it. I must not understand properly (English is not my first or second language). Could you make a quick youtube video?

    Thanks
  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by foto-biz View Post
    Yes, I'm still having an issue with it. I must not understand properly (English is not my first or second language). Could you make a quick youtube video?

    Thanks
    hmm, first of all, I need to understand your problem. I am not sure I understand your problem exactly. so maybe you can show me a video first?


    Nick



    Fanotec
    We listen. We try harder.
  5. #5

    1. I don't have video camera. I only have the 7d that is mounted on the head, so it's one or the other.
    2. When I look at the youtube video: NN3 MKII - 60 Second Setup, the presenter just spin the tightening wheel without any resistance, stickiness...

    I'm still struggling doing the:

    After unwinding the the knob for one turn, press it against the rail using your thumb while bracing the upper rail with your other fingers. Do so with just one hand only so that it will not cause any undue stress on the rails.
    Do you have video of it?

    Thanks

    Thanks
  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by foto-biz View Post
    1. I don't have video camera. I only have the 7d that is mounted on the head, so it's one or the other.
    2. When I look at the youtube video: NN3 MKII - 60 Second Setup, the presenter just spin the tightening wheel without any resistance, stickiness...

    I'm still struggling doing the:



    Do you have video of it?

    Thanks

    Thanks
    You don't need to mount the camera to show the issue. Anyway here is a video to show what I mean
    http://fanotec-public.s3.amazonaws.c...0stickness.mp4

    Nick



    Fanotec
    We listen. We try harder.
  7. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by foto-biz View Post
    2. When I look at the youtube video: NN3 MKII - 60 Second Setup, the presenter just spin the tightening wheel without any resistance, stickiness...
    That be me
    It may appear there is no resistance in rotator but there is just enough (this is adjustable) so you can feel the stops (detents) and due to design makes for very fluid movement.

    Bill
  8. #8

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Bailey View Post
    That be me
    It may appear there is no resistance in rotator but there is just enough (this is adjustable) so you can feel the stops (detents) and due to design makes for very fluid movement.
    Hi, nice to be able to match a face with the person.

    1. I didn't mean the rotator but I mean the screwing in and out of the upper arm.
    2. In the video, you just flick the wheel with one finger and it unscrews a few turns.
  9. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by foto-biz View Post
    Hi, nice to be able to match a face with the person.

    1. I didn't mean the rotator but I mean the screwing in and out of the upper arm.
    2. In the video, you just flick the wheel with one finger and it unscrews a few turns.
    Did the video link below that Nick sent help you?
    Something I haven't tried yet, and Nick please correct me if wrong, but applying "very small" amount of silicon lubricate to cork surface may prevent it from sticking. Also you want to make sure you don't over tighten knobs.
    Bill
  10. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Bailey View Post
    Did the video link below that Nick sent help you?
    Yes, somewhat. My "main" problem is the other "end." I mostly use my Canon 17-55 as the lens. Here's my procedure:

    1. 17mm ==> nodal point: 75mm I do my 1st pano at 17mm
    2. 20mm ==> nodal point: 71mm, redo the same pano at 20mm
    3. 28mm ==> nodal point: 60mm, redo the same pano at 28mm

    between step 1 and step 2, I need to move the camera on the upper arm. That's where I get the problems, as I tighten up the camera plate with the camera, the whole assembly slides backward so it takes me a few times to align correctly the camera.

    Before trying the silicon trick, can somebody confirm it, I don't want to "ruin" the cork.

    Thanks
  11. #11

    Quote Originally Posted by foto-biz View Post
    Yes, somewhat. My "main" problem is the other "end." I mostly use my Canon 17-55 as the lens. Here's my procedure:

    1. 17mm ==> nodal point: 75mm I do my 1st pano at 17mm
    2. 20mm ==> nodal point: 71mm, redo the same pano at 20mm
    3. 28mm ==> nodal point: 60mm, redo the same pano at 28mm

    between step 1 and step 2, I need to move the camera on the upper arm. That's where I get the problems, as I tighten up the camera plate with the camera, the whole assembly slides backward so it takes me a few times to align correctly the camera.

    Before trying the silicon trick, can somebody confirm it, I don't want to "ruin" the cork.

    Thanks
    the silicon trick on second thought might prevent a good sturdy locking to upper arm if applied to wrong area so best not to try that.
    Is your camera plate properly tightened?
    here is a video that shows how to do this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FclsMF_CVg
    Can you take a photo of your setup in the mirror so we can how you have things setup?

    Bill
  12. #12

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Bailey View Post
    Is your camera plate properly tightened?
    here is a video that shows how to do this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FclsMF_CVg
    Yes I saw that video, and that's how I fixed the camera to not sag anymore.
    1. I think that it's properly tightened
    2. Take a look at your video at 2 minutes 30 sec. You use your index finger to screw-in the upper arm knob. Mine is definitely not as smooth, I have to use my hand.

    Were you used a "used" NN5? Will my NN4 eventually become as smooth/buttery? You NN5 has the same cork on the plates as my NN4.

    BTW, thanks for the help.
  13. #13
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    Location: Netherlands
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    Hi,

    It is very hard to understand what you mean. Could you please explain "the whole assembly slides backwards".

    My Workflow to change URS = Upper Rail Settings: My tripod is set up in the way that I can look through the viewfinder without bending down. That way I can not see the rail marks of the upper rail in a proper way. I open up the rotator and change to +30°. Now I open the upper rail knob by holding the camera in my left hand from below, opposite site of shutter release knob. That way you still can be in contact with the rail. Now I "cantle" the camera a little bit and the camera plate comes loose. Now I move to the new URS and fix the knob. Even though the camera with upper rail "looks down", nothing moves backwards. Open rotator and set back to old pitch 0° and close it. Ready for the new set.

    I would not use the silicon. I suppose if once you really "used" the equipment for a while, everything will work fine. In the beginning there a tight fits. I never had this problem with the fixed camera plate on NN3,NN5,NN4. Seems to me like new shoes, you have to walk to get them ready for smooth fit.

    May be there is a problem with the upper knob thread and/or the CP-2 Plate thread. Take off the upper knob from upper rail to get it free. Take a the Cp-2 alone and try to fix the knob to the plate. The threads should go smooth. Using one finger to fix. When you have to use all your fingers to fix it, the threads seems to be ruined, either from CP-2 or the Knob. You can try to " fix it", by trying to move inside the female threads in alignment with the male ones. Move totally inside. Then move back and this might "reinstall" the right threads. Have a look to the threads to check they look ok. Placing the camera to the upper rail and attaching it, you have to "sort align the threads". You can cantle the system in the first moment. So only "screw in" the upper rail knob when it moves smoothly. Once you are closer to the upper, the bottom part of the cp-s will align itself with the rail. Otherwise you might ruin the thread.

    Regards,
    Heinz
    Last edited by hindenhaag; 10-07-2011 at 10:10 PM.
  14. #14
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    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Hong Kong
    Posts: 2,434

    Quote Originally Posted by foto-biz View Post
    Yes, somewhat. My "main" problem is the other "end." I mostly use my Canon 17-55 as the lens. Here's my procedure:

    1. 17mm ==> nodal point: 75mm I do my 1st pano at 17mm
    2. 20mm ==> nodal point: 71mm, redo the same pano at 20mm
    3. 28mm ==> nodal point: 60mm, redo the same pano at 28mm

    between step 1 and step 2, I need to move the camera on the upper arm. That's where I get the problems, as I tighten up the camera plate with the camera, the whole assembly slides backward so it takes me a few times to align correctly the camera.

    Before trying the silicon trick, can somebody confirm it, I don't want to "ruin" the cork.

    Thanks
    you can apply a small amount on the cork. It is grease resistant according to the manufacturer.
    Which reseller did you buy your NN4 from? Maybe you can return it for inspection by reseller, if it is a problematic unit, we will gladly replace it. where are you located? if your reseller is not knowledgeable enough in our products, I can arrange another one nearby.

    Nick



    Fanotec
    We listen. We try harder.
  15. #15

    There is a small O ring on the screw that holds the camera on the upper rail. If you remove that O ring that screw will turn really easy like the video for the NN5 shows. Most of use use a non zoom lens, so we install a stop on the upper rail to put the camera at the correct setting every time we put the camera on the upper rail. I simply push the camera towards the stop while I tighten the screw, that keeps the camera from sliding back while I tighten the screw. If you are using a zoom lens, you are using different lens settings and are probably not using one of those stops, so your camera is sliding either forwards or backwards as you tighten it down.
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