Canon 8-15mm fisheye data

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  1. #16

    Dave, I have CFn IV-1 set to 3 and CFn IV-2 set to 1. I nearly always use the camera in full manual mode, so I don't use auto exposure. I just press the * button to focus (and the lens needs to be in AF for that to operate). The lens will stay in the current position until * is pressed again. When the lens has the focus ring taped in position, I set the camera to MF and don't press *. I just like to keep things simple.

    John
  2. #17
    Users Country Flag 360texas's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2010
    Location: Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts: 34

    Thank you Sir.



    Dave still at 360texas.com
    Forum Moderator Pano2VR
  3. Back Button Focussing

    #18
    Users Country Flag panorama-kontor's Avatar
    Join Date: Feb 2009
    Location: Hamburg / Germany
    Posts: 7
    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by 360texas View Post
    Thank you Sir.
    The way to focus with the * button is called Back-Button-Focussing and is clearly explained here:

    http://www.learn.usa.canon.com/resou..._article.shtml

    I'm using Back-Button-Focussing since a long time and don't wanna miss it anymore. Especially for people and portrait photography it is very useful.

    I'm wondering if there ist no update in the R1/R10 instruction manual. The downloadable PDF is from 2009 (!) and so the Canon EF 8-15mm f/4.0 fisheye is not mentioned at all.

    This thread is one year old and since then, nobody from Nodal Ninja felt responsible to update the instruction manual. It can't be such a big deal to put in the parameters for the Canon EF 8-15mm fisheye!?!?

    I just purchased a NN R1 with the nice new small 90° and 60° Rotators here in Germany and there was no instruction manual at all coming with the gear!

    Do I really need to find the settings by using google and different panorama photographer forums around the world?

    Come on Nodal Ninja, do your job and update the manual! Or even better, create a seperate one for this zoom lense because it is a little bit tricky and different to my Canon 15mm f/2.8 fisheye and my Sigma 8mm f/3.5 fisheye.

    I'm not sure that it is a goof idea to hide all buttons inside of the ring!?

    Anyway, please publish some more informations about using a NN R1/R10 and the (not so new anymore) Canon EF 8-15mm fisheye!

    Sorry for my low level english but it is not my native language.

    Regards
    Andreas
  4. #19
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Hong Kong
    Posts: 2,366

    Hi Andreas,

    Sorry for the missing manual. we are working on some of the overdue manuals now.
    for the NPP value, you can determine it quickly by following this tutorial.
    http://www.johnhpanos.com/epcalib.htm

    Nick



    Fanotec
    We listen. We try harder.
  5. #20

    Allright...I've just recently bought the Canon Ef 8-15 and found this link with the NNP of the lens by surfing in internet:

    http://michel.thoby.free.fr/Canon_8-...llaxPointx.com

    I was recommended to go for 15 mm on my lens on the full frame body (5d mark2) for better resolution...This means shooting more frames but must be worth...English is not my native language I just wanted to check if I understood the link above right...On 15 mm when I take as the NNP the green big dot marked with "4 shots (practically valid for the whole 8-15 mm focal range)" I cannot do wrong...Am I right?
  6. #21

    At zoom setting 15mm, you shoot 6 shots around, so use the NPP position identified on Michel's picture as "6-shots". It only takes a few minutes to check that this works ok. See the tutorial at the link that Nick referred you to.
    .
    John
  7. #22

    Quote Originally Posted by John Houghton View Post
    At zoom setting 15mm, you shoot 6 shots around, so use the NPP position identified on Michel's picture as "6-shots". It only takes a few minutes to check that this works ok. See the tutorial at the link that Nick referred you to.
    .
    John
    John thank you very much...
  8. #23
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: May 2012
    Location: Whangarei, New Zealand
    Posts: 1

    This is one frustrating lens!! You have to watch all the time that focussing has not moved by just a fraction or everythig is fuzzy. The limiter is pointless in my opinion, it could better be a lock on the focus ring.
    I first focussed the lens by test-firing from my laptop, with the camera simply mounted on a tripod so I could make any changes needed. I then taped up the focus ring, switched to MF then connected the lens to the R1.
    I set the LPP first by looking at vertical lines far apart from each other, but in line with the camera. Now I swivelled the camera within the outer ring to 60 degrees from horizontal (so the diagonaly opposite corners of the image are vertical). Taking 6 shots around plus a manual shot of the nadir. results so far...the 6 shots stitch well with the tiniest hole at the zenit, easily healed. The nadir shot usually stitches in, sometimes with a little help in PTGui.
    Thanks to articles from Michel Thorby and also Roger Berry for the diagonal trick.
  9. #24

    I tried hard all day with my new 5D M III and the 8-15. I used a R10-7.5° 4 shots @ 12,3mm ( right end of the 2 marking ). The nadir setting is 8,5mm. It is very important to set the crop circle perfect in PTGui, then there is no misalignment even with very close-by objects. I tryed the new HDR function too with +/- 1 EV. A flash-pano can be seen here > http://www.panoweb.at > Test - Canon 5D MIII + 8-15 Fisheye HDR +/- 1EV
  10. #25

    Quote Originally Posted by Thaler Design GmbH View Post
    It is very important to set the crop circle perfect in PTGui, then there is no misalignment even with very close-by objects.
    I'm not sure what you mean by "perfect". The crop circle positioning should not make any appreciable difference to the quality of the alignment if you are optimizing correctly in PTGui. I've verified that this is so by shifting the crop circle so that it is far from being centered, and it has no effect whatever on either the optimization report or the the stitched panorama. The alignment is identical.
    .
    John
  11. #26

    John, I guess he has not learned about shift yet. In theory a perfect crop circle set at the exact edge should make optimizing for shift unnecessary. But as you say the cropcircle does not at all need to be centered if you optimize for shift.
    Hans
  12. #27

    Quote Originally Posted by hansnyberg View Post
    In theory a perfect crop circle set at the exact edge should make optimizing for shift unnecessary.
    The edge of the image circle is in any case not well defined, so it's not really practical to set the crop circle accurately just by eye. However, after optimizing the shift parameters their values can be added to the crop circle parameters, which centers the crop on the optical centre of the lens. Subsequent optimization then yields shift parameters <1.
    .
    John
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