Coming Soon: Foot Plate for Using Rotator at the Base of Pole
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Thread: Coming Soon: Foot Plate for Using Rotator at the Base of Pole

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  1. Coming Soon: Foot Plate for Using Rotator at the Base of Pole

    #1
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Hong Kong
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    As part of the pole systems, Fanotec is releasing a light-weight foot plate for using a click-stop rotator at the base of pole.





    The foot plate allows Fanotec Rotators (RD4/8/12/16 and forthcoming compact pole rotator) to be attached to the base of pole. It features a spring loaded tilting mechanism for use on uneven ground with a slope up to 30 degrees.

    When used with spikes it will grip any rough surfaces such as rocks or concrete surfaces and prevent the rotator from moving. Photographers will no longer need to guess the angle of rotation for each shot. Precise rotation intervals are possible by using a click-stop rotator. This will help expedite the pano taking process.

    The spikes are removable and can be stored on the plate when not in use. The base of the foot plate has rubber pads. This allows the foot plate to be used on smooth surfaces or places where spikes are prohibited. Photographers can simply step on the foot plate to prevent it from moving.

    The foot plate will have an introductory price of $49.95. It will be available in Jan/Feb 2011.

    A sealed, compact, low cost pole rotator is also under development. It will have an introductory offer of $49.95 and will be available in Jan/Feb 2011.



    Acknowledgement: This foot plate is based on home-made version of Wim Koornneef, a talented tinkerer and designer.



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  2. #2
    Users Country Flag badders's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2009
    Location: East Kilbride, Scotland
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    OOOH! Nice!



    Badders
  3. #3

    Hello Forum,

    From experience I can tell that the footplate and the rotator at the bottom end of the pole will make the shoot much more relaxed then without.
    Without a rotator you often shoot many more images then needed "just to be on the safe side", hence the shoot and the processing afterwards will take much more time then needed.

    When the spikes are mounted on the footplate it is possible, depending on the structure of the ground, to rotate the pole without any need to step on the footplate, the springloaded footplate will press itself against the ground (*) and the spikes will holding it in a firm position.
    (*) You don't have to press the pole to the ground, the weight of the gear is enough to press the footplate to the ground.

    You can choose to walk around the pole when rotating to keep yourself out of sight or to keep a steady position and only rotate the pole, whatever method you choose when using the footplate the shoot will be relaxed.

    Here are some pano examples shot with a Fanotec pole, a footplate, a Fanotec R-D4 rotator and a Fanotec R1 lens ring on top of the pole.
    All panos are shot 6 around with a Canon 5D+Tokina 10-17 set @14,8mm tilt -15 degree and set @12,2mm tilt 0 degree, lens is approx. 10 mm shifted forwards out of NPP to reduce the footprint of the pole.

    http://www.dmmdh.nl/panos/margraten_...image_001.html

    Happy pole shooting greetings,
    Wim
  4. #4
    Users Country Flag
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wim.Koornneef View Post
    When the spikes are mounted on the footplate it is possible, depending on the structure of the ground, to rotate the pole without any need to step on the footplate, the springloaded footplate will press itself against the ground (*) and the spikes will holding it in a firm position.
    (*) You don't have to press the pole to the ground, the weight of the gear is enough to press the footplate to the ground.

    You can choose to walk around the pole when rotating to keep yourself out of sight or to keep a steady position and only rotate the pole, whatever method you choose when using the footplate the shoot will be relaxed.
    Hi Wim,

    Thanks a lot for explaining how the foot plate functions.
    A big thank again for sharing your briliant design idea with Fanotec and hence people in need of this accessory.

    Nick



    Fanotec
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  5. #5

    How well does it work in snow or soft sand or muddy conditions?
  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemonDuck View Post
    How well does it work in snow or soft sand or muddy conditions?
    not sure. it may require a longer spike for anti-rotation. A sealed rotator is needed for muddy condition.

    Nick



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  7. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by DemonDuck View Post
    How well does it work in snow or soft sand or muddy conditions?
    If the long blunt spike that is included isn't holding in sand or snow (this depends on the structure of the sand or snow) then a long pin (*) that is pushed in the ground against the side of the footplate will prevent rotation.
    (*) The pin can be anything, an old screwdriver, a strong wooden stick, you get the idea. For safety reasons it is better not to replace the long blunt spike by a very long spike but to use a seperate pin instead.

    For a real muddy ground you need a support base, f.i. a small multiplex wooden tile or something like that, to prevent that the rotator will sink in the mud.
    As Nick already explained for such conditions you also need a sealed rotator so it is not wise to use the R-D4/8/16 rotators in this condition.
    BTW, to protect the rotator from dust in all situations it is best to close the not used detent sockets, the rubber plugs available for the R-D4/8/16 rotators are suited for this.

    Wim
    Last edited by Wim.Koornneef; 12-08-2010 at 11:21 AM.
  8. #8
    Users Country Flag
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    Location: Sitges, Spain
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    Looks great, any idea when the extension poles will be ready please?

    Neil
  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiritburner View Post
    Looks great, any idea when the extension poles will be ready please?

    Neil
    extension poles for Series 1 pole? probably in Feb.

    nick



    Fanotec
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  10. #10

    Hi, I just ordered a Pole Series 1 and I am really satisfied with the product.
    I noticed at the bottom of the specification page that Important Safety Notes states:

    Fanotec poles are NOT designed to be mounted onto a rigid tripod. The pole base can be damaged by the added torque generated with the use of camera and lens at full extension. We are developing dedicated accessories for safe use with tripods.
    Now my questions is: why is it ok on footplate rotator and not on a tripod?
  11. #11

    Quote Originally Posted by keko View Post
    Hi, I just ordered a Pole Series 1 and I am really satisfied with the product.
    I noticed at the bottom of the specification page that Important Safety Notes states:

    Now my questions is: why is it ok on footplate rotator and not on a tripod?
    Hello Keko,

    First a short explanation to prevent any misunderstanding.
    When mounting a pole on a tripod, other then using a dedicated adapter like the one that will be released by Fanotec early next year, the sideway force on the pole (caused by wind, movement of the tripod, excentric gravity point, etc) will cause bending forces at the connection of tripod and pole.
    Due to the weight of the gear and the spread of the legs a tripod is standing in a fixed position on the ground so all bending forces on the pole will be fully applied to the connectors.
    Depending on the height of the pole the bending force can be really huge so it can happen that the connectors of the tripod and or pole will break, tear off etc.
    Apart from the damage to tripod and pole it is also possible that the camera will fall on the ground with safety risks and damage of the camera as well.

    When a rotator is mounted between tripod and pole then the bending forces as explained above will also be applied on the rotator. Panohead rotators are developed to withstand large vertical forces but they can only withstand a limited amount of bending forces hence when mounted between a tripod and a pole it can happen that the bending forces will also destroy the rotator.

    To overcome the bending force limitation of a panohead rotator Fanotec will release early next year a dedicated pole rotator that is capable to handle large bending forces.

    Now the answer to your question.
    When a rotator and a footplate are mounted at the bottom of a pole then there are no bending forces possible on the connection between pole, rotator and footplate, this is because the mounting plate will wobble on the ground when you move the pole sideways in all directions.
    Only when the footplate would be hammered with nails or mounted with screws on the floor to make a fixed free stand then bending forces will be applied again to all parts but then the footplate is used in a bad way....

    I can assure you when you use the pole handheld with a rotator and a footplate then there are no risks of damaging the pole, rotator or footplate when you use the pole in a way it is designed for.

    Of course there are other issues that you have to take care off when using a pole.
    For instance, the pole is made of carbon fibre, carbon is a very good electrical conductor so when you hit an unprotected electrical wire with a high voltage then for sure there is a huge safety risk.
    In all situations where people are around or objects close by you have to take care that you don't harm people or damage objects and when using a footplate then you have to take care that you remove the spikes when the surface of the ground is vulnarable for dents and scratches.

    When you use common sense and take the safety risks in account then I am sure you will like your Series 1 pole a lot and that you will never regret buying it.

    Happy pole shooting greetings,
    Wim
    Last edited by Wim.Koornneef; 12-10-2010 at 04:51 AM.
  12. #12
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    Join Date: Aug 2008
    Location: Netherlands
    Posts: 1,741

    Wim and Keko,

    I'd like to give an addition to all the very good explanation: I use the pole, either on monopod or baby tripod or normal tripod by touching the pole in front of my face to turn it on the rotator. This means, my hands are helping against the stress of bending forces. Using a very steady tripod, the height of it is limited by the length of the pole with shortest length, my body and the length of my arms.

    I use : tripod, Arca style QRS, plate fitted to bottom of rotator, either R1 splitted rotator or Rd 16 rotator, pole fix to rotator, mini quick release system on top of pole. This means, I have one mini QRS on top of the pole, plate on top of rotator, miniclamp fixed to top of R1 with camera lens ring mounted to the top of this. So opening up the mini clamp, I have a free camera combination. Next QRS is the pole rotator section: So having raised my tripod to a height near my hips, I add the pole rotator section and level it. I choose for a height of this system that I easily can add my camera on top and still am able to raise the pole segments as well.

    When turning to the next stop, I always add my hand in front of my face to the pole, you can easily turn to the next stop at that position. After reaching the next stop, I fix the detend and the fixing knob of the rotator when pole is at full length to take of bending stress from the rotator.

    Till now I tested this combi with pole at full length with D90 nikkor 10.5. With not too heavy winds. Keeping at least one hand on the pole, I had no problem. But you have to be careful, at own risk of weight and height.

    Cheers
    Heinz
  13. #13
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2010
    Location: Ventura Ca. USA
    Posts: 32

    Any update on these foot plates yet.
    I want one asap for a pole with a twin camera setup I'm working on.

    Roger
  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cameleer View Post
    Any update on these foot plates yet.
    I want one asap for a pole with a twin camera setup I'm working on.

    Roger
    available next week.

    Nick



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  15. #15
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2010
    Location: Ventura Ca. USA
    Posts: 32

    Quote Originally Posted by nick fan View Post
    available next week.

    Nick
    It’s next week, can I get a Pole footplate now?
    And will the Rotator Knob Set for RD16 work with the RD4 rotator? I’m thinking of getting the RD4 rotator and adding some extra stops to it. This way I can keep things lightweight, small and still have the extra stops that I will be needing for shooting 3D panos.

    I love taking things apart and modifying them.

    Roger

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