Coming Soon: Foot Plate for Using Rotator at the Base of Pole
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  1. Coming Soon: Foot Plate for Using Rotator at the Base of Pole

    #1
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    As part of the pole systems, Fanotec is releasing a light-weight foot plate for using a click-stop rotator at the base of pole.





    The foot plate allows Fanotec Rotators (RD4/8/12/16 and forthcoming compact pole rotator) to be attached to the base of pole. It features a spring loaded tilting mechanism for use on uneven ground with a slope up to 30 degrees.

    When used with spikes it will grip any rough surfaces such as rocks or concrete surfaces and prevent the rotator from moving. Photographers will no longer need to guess the angle of rotation for each shot. Precise rotation intervals are possible by using a click-stop rotator. This will help expedite the pano taking process.

    The spikes are removable and can be stored on the plate when not in use. The base of the foot plate has rubber pads. This allows the foot plate to be used on smooth surfaces or places where spikes are prohibited. Photographers can simply step on the foot plate to prevent it from moving.

    The foot plate will have an introductory price of $49.95. It will be available in Jan/Feb 2011.

    A sealed, compact, low cost pole rotator is also under development. It will have an introductory offer of $49.95 and will be available in Jan/Feb 2011.



    Acknowledgement: This foot plate is based on home-made version of Wim Koornneef, a talented tinkerer and designer.



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  2. #2
    Users Country Flag badders's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2009
    Location: East Kilbride, Scotland
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    OOOH! Nice!



    Badders
  3. #3

    Hello Forum,

    From experience I can tell that the footplate and the rotator at the bottom end of the pole will make the shoot much more relaxed then without.
    Without a rotator you often shoot many more images then needed "just to be on the safe side", hence the shoot and the processing afterwards will take much more time then needed.

    When the spikes are mounted on the footplate it is possible, depending on the structure of the ground, to rotate the pole without any need to step on the footplate, the springloaded footplate will press itself against the ground (*) and the spikes will holding it in a firm position.
    (*) You don't have to press the pole to the ground, the weight of the gear is enough to press the footplate to the ground.

    You can choose to walk around the pole when rotating to keep yourself out of sight or to keep a steady position and only rotate the pole, whatever method you choose when using the footplate the shoot will be relaxed.

    Here are some pano examples shot with a Fanotec pole, a footplate, a Fanotec R-D4 rotator and a Fanotec R1 lens ring on top of the pole.
    All panos are shot 6 around with a Canon 5D+Tokina 10-17 set @14,8mm tilt -15 degree and set @12,2mm tilt 0 degree, lens is approx. 10 mm shifted forwards out of NPP to reduce the footprint of the pole.

    http://www.dmmdh.nl/panos/margraten_...image_001.html

    Happy pole shooting greetings,
    Wim
  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wim.Koornneef View Post
    When the spikes are mounted on the footplate it is possible, depending on the structure of the ground, to rotate the pole without any need to step on the footplate, the springloaded footplate will press itself against the ground (*) and the spikes will holding it in a firm position.
    (*) You don't have to press the pole to the ground, the weight of the gear is enough to press the footplate to the ground.

    You can choose to walk around the pole when rotating to keep yourself out of sight or to keep a steady position and only rotate the pole, whatever method you choose when using the footplate the shoot will be relaxed.
    Hi Wim,

    Thanks a lot for explaining how the foot plate functions.
    A big thank again for sharing your briliant design idea with Fanotec and hence people in need of this accessory.

    Nick



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  5. #5

    How well does it work in snow or soft sand or muddy conditions?
  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemonDuck View Post
    How well does it work in snow or soft sand or muddy conditions?
    not sure. it may require a longer spike for anti-rotation. A sealed rotator is needed for muddy condition.

    Nick



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  7. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by DemonDuck View Post
    How well does it work in snow or soft sand or muddy conditions?
    If the long blunt spike that is included isn't holding in sand or snow (this depends on the structure of the sand or snow) then a long pin (*) that is pushed in the ground against the side of the footplate will prevent rotation.
    (*) The pin can be anything, an old screwdriver, a strong wooden stick, you get the idea. For safety reasons it is better not to replace the long blunt spike by a very long spike but to use a seperate pin instead.

    For a real muddy ground you need a support base, f.i. a small multiplex wooden tile or something like that, to prevent that the rotator will sink in the mud.
    As Nick already explained for such conditions you also need a sealed rotator so it is not wise to use the R-D4/8/16 rotators in this condition.
    BTW, to protect the rotator from dust in all situations it is best to close the not used detent sockets, the rubber plugs available for the R-D4/8/16 rotators are suited for this.

    Wim
    Last edited by Wim.Koornneef; 12-08-2010 at 11:21 AM.
  8. #8
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    Looks great, any idea when the extension poles will be ready please?

    Neil
  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiritburner View Post
    Looks great, any idea when the extension poles will be ready please?

    Neil
    extension poles for Series 1 pole? probably in Feb.

    nick



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  10. #10

    If you use two spikes -- one in the center and one on the end -- and you have two different spike styles -- sharp and blunt -- then shouldn't you have 4 sockets for storing unused spikes? Like if you use no spikes when spikes are prohibited?
  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemonDuck View Post
    If you use two spikes -- one in the center and one on the end -- and you have two different spike styles -- sharp and blunt -- then shouldn't you have 4 sockets for storing unused spikes? Like if you use no spikes when spikes are prohibited?
    The long blunt "spike" is for use on soft ground such as grass land to provide more anti-twisting force. Since the spike under the pole is near the center, there is no advantage to use a longer spike. Hence only one long spike is provided.

    Nick



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  12. #12

    I shoot on soft surfaces all the time. If I was using your foot plate, I would want a spike on the end also. The spike in the middle can't provide anti-twisting torque forces. It can only provide lateral stability. On soft surfaces, the spike on the end would be providing almost all the anti-torque forces. So two spikes would be necessary.
  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemonDuck View Post
    I shoot on soft surfaces all the time. If I was using your foot plate, I would want a spike on the end also. The spike in the middle can't provide anti-twisting torque forces. It can only provide lateral stability. On soft surfaces, the spike on the end would be providing almost all the anti-torque forces. So two spikes would be necessary.
    Hi DemonDuck,
    The foot plate has 3 spicks.
    Two short and one longer, one in the center and one goes on the end.
    On soft surfaces you could make even a longer spike if needed, and standing on it will help.

    Roger Berry
    Last edited by Cameleer; 03-04-2011 at 01:26 PM.
  14. #14

    Quote Originally Posted by Cameleer View Post
    Hi DemonDuck,
    The foot plate has 3 spicks.
    Two smaller ones that go in the center and a longer one that goes on the end.
    On soft surfaces you could add a longer spike if needed, and standing on it will help.

    Roger Berry
    You've missed my point. The point is that if you have two types of spikes and use two spikes -- one in the center and one on the end of the foot -- you need 4 storage sockets for the times when you use no spikes.
  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemonDuck View Post
    The spike in the middle can't provide anti-twisting torque forces. It can only provide lateral stability. On soft surfaces, the spike on the end would be providing almost all the anti-torque forces. So two spikes would be necessary.
    that is why you don't need a long spike in the "middle". Why bother to change it or make it?

    Nick



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