Canon 7d Settings?

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  1. Canon 7d Settings?

    #1

    Hi Everyone,

    Since upgrading my camera from my old faithful 300d to an all singing all dancing 7d, I have not had a chance to make use of my trusty NN3, and I was dismayed today to discover that there are no settings on this site for the 7d at all!

    Are there any settings that people have already calculated for the 7d or am I going to have to work them out for myself?

    I tried doing a search for this on the forum, but apparently 7d is too short a word to search on. :(

    Thanks,

    Stephen
  2. #2
  3. #3
    Users Country Flag badders's Avatar
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    I've got the 7D. What lens are you using?



    Badders
  4. #4

    Hi Heinz, thanks for the link, I will see how much further I get on now :)

    Andrew, I am quite a novice at this pano lark, and the widest lens I have is the kit lens that I got with my camera (18-135).
  5. Settings for spherical panos with your kit lens

    #5
    Users Country Flag
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    Hi Scropp,

    Zoom set to 18mm:

    You have to go for 4 rows, detend plunger set to 30° , makes 12 stops.

    The settings are calculated with an overlap of 30%.

    Now your upper rail sets in "Pitch", which means turn the upper rail up or down.

    1. row 55°
    2. row 20°
    3. row -15°
    4. row -50°

    To this you have to shoot a zenith at +90° and 2 shots with -90° with nadir adaptor, or 3 with handheld.

    Using the nadir adaptor on NN3 you have to subtract 6 mm of your LRS = lower rail setting.

    BTW: trying to find your NPP: turning your camera to a direction and the reference point follows you up, imagine a person walking aside of you. To keep in contact moving forward, you have to walk forward: move the camera forward. The reference point is moving against the turning direction, the person is not walking with you, it is passing by, to keep in contact you have to walk backwards.

    "walking with you" = camera forward, "walking against you" = camera backwards.

    LRS = lower rail setting: hacksaw tooth is cutting to the left, move the camera to the left. Hacksaw tooth cutting to the right, move the camera to the right. Move the camera to the direction the tooth cuts.

    I am Nikonian. But I am quite sure Badders will help you with the settings.

    Kit lenses might be a start up to be used for panos. I know all the equipment asks a lot of money.

    But to use a kit lens, is not the easiest start to do panos. 4 rows with 12 stops, plus 3 or 4 shots for Z and N might cause a lot of problems in preparing - stitching your pano. People, cars, clouds, trees, water moving around while you take your pictures might end up in a "ghost" pano. This means, when you do your second row there are other people in sight as in the first row. ...

    A fisheye lens would be a better start up. A manual Samyang 8mm, a Sigma 8mm - I do not like it so much - or a Nikkor 10.5 with canon adaptor might be a good choice to go on without frustration.

    Ask Badders, he will help you. For the rest, feel free to ask.

    Sucess

    Heinz
  6. #6

    Quote Originally Posted by hindenhaag View Post
    Hi Scropp,

    Zoom set to 18mm:

    You have to go for 4 rows, detend plunger set to 30° , makes 12 stops.

    The settings are calculated with an overlap of 30%.

    Now your upper rail sets in "Pitch", which means turn the upper rail up or down.

    1. row 55°
    2. row 20°
    3. row -15°
    4. row -50°

    To this you have to shoot a zenith at +90° and 2 shots with -90° with nadir adaptor, or 3 with handheld.

    Using the nadir adaptor on NN3 you have to subtract 6 mm of your LRS = lower rail setting.

    BTW: trying to find your NPP: turning your camera to a direction and the reference point follows you up, imagine a person walking aside of you. To keep in contact moving forward, you have to walk forward: move the camera forward. The reference point is moving against the turning direction, the person is not walking with you, it is passing by, to keep in contact you have to walk backwards.

    "walking with you" = camera forward, "walking against you" = camera backwards.

    LRS = lower rail setting: hacksaw tooth is cutting to the left, move the camera to the left. Hacksaw tooth cutting to the right, move the camera to the right. Move the camera to the direction the tooth cuts.

    I am Nikonian. But I am quite sure Badders will help you with the settings.

    Kit lenses might be a start up to be used for panos. I know all the equipment asks a lot of money.

    But to use a kit lens, is not the easiest start to do panos. 4 rows with 12 stops, plus 3 or 4 shots for Z and N might cause a lot of problems in preparing - stitching your pano. People, cars, clouds, trees, water moving around while you take your pictures might end up in a "ghost" pano. This means, when you do your second row there are other people in sight as in the first row. ...

    A fisheye lens would be a better start up. A manual Samyang 8mm, a Sigma 8mm - I do not like it so much - or a Nikkor 10.5 with canon adaptor might be a good choice to go on without frustration.

    Ask Badders, he will help you. For the rest, feel free to ask.

    Sucess

    Heinz
    Really Heinz.

    You do not need to shoot 4 rows with an 18mm.
    3 rows with 12 + 1 zenith is more than enough with a 1.6 APS sensor

    If you have a NIkon you can shoot 3x10 and still have 23% overlap which is enough.

    Hans
  7. #7
    Users Country Flag badders's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by scropp View Post
    Andrew, I am quite a novice at this pano lark, and the widest lens I have is the kit lens that I got with my camera (18-135).
    Set lower arm to 53. The links posted should help you set the upper arm.



    Badders
  8. #8

    Thanks, I will give it a go as soon as I get the time.

    Unfortunately cost is an issue thanks to the current climate. I have been looking into the possibility of hiring an 8mm sigma for a weekend but I want to get some practice in before playing that game.
  9. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by hansnyberg View Post
    Really Heinz.

    You do not need to shoot 4 rows with an 18mm.
    3 rows with 12 + 1 zenith is more than enough with a 1.6 APS sensor

    If you have a NIkon you can shoot 3x10 and still have 23% overlap which is enough.

    Hans
    I must admit, I used to use 3x10 in the past, and I usually got away with just about enough overlap.

    Quote Originally Posted by badders View Post
    Set lower arm to 53. The links posted should help you set the upper arm.
    Great, thanks, I will give it a go :)
  10. #10

    Hi all,
    I dont want to create new thread for 7D...

    I see that lower arm is suggested to 53, perfect.

    What about the upper arm? What type of lenses are you using?

    Does anybody know the setting for those lenses:

    Sigma 10mm F2.8 HSM fisheye
    Tokina 12-24 F4
    Canon 17-55 F2,8 IS USM


    Thank you,
    Stepan
  11. #11

    Not to hijack even further, but 7D + Samyang 8mm (aka Rokinon, etc) settings also appreciated :)
  12. #12

    Hi,

    I am afraid I don't have any of the lenses you ask about, I wish I did, but the method described in the link at the top of the page worked a treat, and only took a few minutes to get pretty accurate.

    Stephen
  13. #13
    Users Country Flag badders's Avatar
    Join Date: Jan 2009
    Location: East Kilbride, Scotland
    Posts: 349

    Quote Originally Posted by mitchfx View Post
    Not to hijack even further, but 7D + Samyang 8mm (aka Rokinon, etc) settings also appreciated :)
    Lower arm is still 53, irrespective of which lens you are using. I've also posted in your other thread the settings for the NN5.



    Badders
  14. #14

    Interesting...I found a lower setting of 58 works for my 7d on the NN3 Mk2, not 53. Could this be due to difference between camera mounting plate thickness (mine is CP-2) ?

    Thanks,
    m
    Last edited by mitchfx; 09-18-2010 at 06:35 PM.
  15. #15
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    Mitch,

    the CP-Plates are the same in thickness. With all my info from this forum, I am Nikonian, 58 seems to be a bit off site.

    Check your LRS with this: http://www.easypano.com/forum/displa...1&TopicID=4162

    If the saw cuts to the right, you have to move the camera to the right, if it cuts to the left, to the left. At least you have to test mm by mm.

    Regards,

    Heinz

    Test
    Last edited by hindenhaag; 09-19-2010 at 01:11 AM.
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