Camera Height

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  1. Camera Height

    #1

    When shooting single row 360 degree panos for real estate tours, what is the best height to shoot at? Eye level with 8 foot ceiling just doesn't seem quite right. Is there a rule about this?

    My lens is a sigma 10-20mm that I set at 10mm.

    I'm trying to read as much as I can to learn, but I end up so overwhelmed. I'm new at this so thanks for any help you can offer.

    Julie
  2. Re: Camera Height

    #2

    I'm 6'6" and I'm not very diplomatic on adhering to "standards" when shooting... I shoot at my eye level, and that's it. I'm not much for bending and breaking my back, just to get some interior shots

    But I understand the concerns there are in regard to shooting height. For homes it seems to make sense to many, that the shooting height is that of a person sitting at a dining table... that's a "comfortable view" most people have no problem with at all. In a standard ceiling height home (8' / 2.44 m), it would be just around half the height towards the ceiling: 4 ft /122cm. Maybe a couple of inches above that, but not much more.

  3. Re: Camera Height

    #3
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Sep 2009
    Location: Los Angeles, CA
    Posts: 344

    Here in Los Angeles, the building code puts residential doors at about 6'6". My head barely clears that. I put the lens at 3'3" to 3'9" high. When you view my panoramas, there will be equal parts ceiling and floor when viewed at 0 degrees pitch.

    Whatever height gets equal parts ceiling and floor, that would be my recommended height. Any higher or lower just does not look right.
  4. Re: Camera Height

    #4

    Heck... I just made myself bigger with that typo. I'm only 6'4" (196cm) ..... but that has been reason enough to smack my head into hundreds of ceiling rafts and door frames and light fixtures etc. while living in Denmark, where older houses are often designed for Hobbits.... or so it felt most of the time.

    I can see that you are also on the half-way method. Personally I feel uncomfortable viewing panos from that low angle, simply because it "shrinks" me.... but equally some people feel it awkward to view panos shot from my eye level... and what I don´t like about my eye level, is exactly the difference in the size of the ceiling and the floor.
  5. Re: Camera Height

    #5

    Quote Originally Posted by jewelsok View Post
    When shooting single row 360 degree panos for real estate tours, what is the best height to shoot at? Eye level with 8 foot ceiling just doesn't seem quite right. Is there a rule about this?
    My lens is a sigma 10-20mm that I set at 10mm.
    I'm trying to read as much as I can to learn, but I end up so overwhelmed. I'm new at this so thanks for any help you can offer.
    Julie
    Good question Julie - here's my take.
    When selling something like a house the purpose of a panorama to is depict to the viewer what the home will look at as if they were standing at the location themselves. So shooting at eye level is preferred. According to some stats I pulled off the web the average height of an adult male in the US is 69.2 inches (175.8 cm), or 5 feet 9.2 inches and for a woman it's 63.8 inches (162.1 cm), or 5 feet 3.8 inches.
    Thinking most purchases are heavily influenced by the female gender I would be inclined to shoot more on the lower side. Shooting within this range (keep in mind this is head to toe measuring) should give potential buyers the best perspective for viewing the property. So once you do the home panos - take an extra one from the eye level of a dog next to the dog door and tell the client this is what it would the room would look like from Fido's perspective .

    The same holds true for autos - some shoot from the center of the vehicle and some shoot from the drivers seat. If the pano is for a car lot sale I would shoot from the driver seat as it gives a truer perspective how the vehicle is laid out.
    You could divert from the norm when shooting more from an artistic standpoint where you can expand creativity and shot from different perspectives depending on client needs. And finally speaking of client needs you should always ask for their opinions as well since they are paying for your work.

    Good luck
    Bill
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