Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate
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  1. Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #1

    Hi

    After having (and sold) nn3, I purchased NN 5 + RD16 Rotator.

    I noticed that camera plate with NN5 came with cork, while previous one was with rubber.
    http://store.nodalninja.com/product_p/n-cp1.htm

    After shooting +50 panos I also noticed that camera plate tends to rotate due to camera weight.
    My equipment is not too heavy: Olympus E-30 + Zuiko Digital 8mm fisheye.
    Cork also tends to compress so I need to tighten camera plate every so.

    I tightened it well but I'm also afraid that I may damage thread on camera If I tighten camera plate too much.

    I'm wondering how to ensure that camera plate isn't rotating,
    because even small move may cause problems when stiching images into pano.

    Doesn't rubber provide better friction and durability than cork?

    NN5, especially in combo with RD16 isn't cheap,
    so I'm unhappy when small issue like this sometimes causes me trouble in stiching,
    or takes extra time because I need to recheck if camera plate is properly aligned with camera
    every time I'm attaching camera onto NN.

    Any suggestions?

    Regards

    PS: gluing it is out of question

  2. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #2

    Hi
    what camera plate do you have?
    I am also new and got my nn5L with RD16 only a few weeks ago. I shot maybe around 100 panos right now and do not face a problem with my camera plate with cork. I have a Canon 40D with Tokina Fisheye.

    Regards
    Kai

  3. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #3
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Hong Kong
    Posts: 2,475

    Quote Originally Posted by Krx View Post
    Hi

    After having (and sold) nn3, I purchased NN 5 + RD16 Rotator.

    I noticed that camera plate with NN5 came with cork, while previous one was with rubber.
    http://store.nodalninja.com/product_p/n-cp1.htm

    After shooting +50 panos I also noticed that camera plate tends to rotate due to camera weight.
    My equipment is not too heavy: Olympus E-30 + Zuiko Digital 8mm fisheye.
    Cork also tends to compress so I need to tighten camera plate every so.

    I tightened it well but I'm also afraid that I may damage thread on camera If I tighten camera plate too much.

    I'm wondering how to ensure that camera plate isn't rotating,
    because even small move may cause problems when stiching images into pano.

    Doesn't rubber provide better friction and durability than cork?

    NN5, especially in combo with RD16 isn't cheap,
    so I'm unhappy when small issue like this sometimes causes me trouble in stiching,
    or takes extra time because I need to recheck if camera plate is properly aligned with camera
    every time I'm attaching camera onto NN.

    Any suggestions?

    Regards

    PS: gluing it is out of question

    The cork we use is much more expensive than rubber we used previously. It is harder and cause less tilting when the mounting surface is not symmetrical to the mounting screw.
    We are also developing new camera mounting plate with anti-twisting feature. It should solve your problem completely. At the moment just tighten the screw a bit more. BTW, do you mount the camera mounting plate in such as way that the contact surface is max? You can revert the camera mounting plate by 180 deg to better match the camera base.

    Nick






    Fanotec
    We listen. We try harder.
  4. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #4

    Hi Nick

    Yes, contact surface is max used.
    Just noticed your PM. Will reply there as well.
  5. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #5
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Saddleworth UK
    Posts: 242

    Quote Originally Posted by nick fan View Post
    The cork we use is much more expensive than rubber we used previously. It is harder and cause less tilting when the mounting surface is not symmetrical to the mounting screw.
    We are also developing new camera mounting plate with anti-twisting feature. It should solve your problem completely. At the moment just tighten the screw a bit more. BTW, do you mount the camera mounting plate in such as way that the contact surface is max? You can revert the camera mounting plate by 180 deg to better match the camera base.

    Nick
    Is the cork you use the cork/neoprene mix that is used for gaskets. It is capable of very close fits and grips.
  6. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #6
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Hong Kong
    Posts: 2,475

    Quote Originally Posted by Terrywoodenpic View Post
    Is the cork you use the cork/neoprene mix that is used for gaskets. It is capable of very close fits and grips.
    Yes, it is for gaskets. Not sure of its composition.

    Nick



    Fanotec
    We listen. We try harder.
  7. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #7
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Saddleworth UK
    Posts: 242

    Quote Originally Posted by nick fan View Post
    Yes, it is for gaskets. Not sure of its composition.

    Nick
    If it is gasket material you are using the best material you can get for the job.
  8. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #8

    Hi, n00b here, I just got my NN5 w/ RD16 as my xmas present to myself. I'm reading through the forums for info on mounting plates and QR's.

    I wanted to follow up on this thread, as it's now 6 months later. In August, it was mentioned that a new version of the camera mounting plate was 'in the works'.

    The camera mounting plate I received with my NN5 has a small right angle lip on it. This fits my Olympus E-520 body very nicely, although I feel the install is a bit fiddly with the small hex set screw that needs to be adjusted to get the plate at the right offset for my camera body, and which is then inaccessible once the plate is installed. It would be nicer to mount the plate loosely to the body first, then adjust the set screw to position the plate correctly, then tighten both the mounting screw and set screw. It's difficult to get the set screw adjusted so that the lip contacts the body, without worrying that there are unseen forces being applied pulling the plate out of shape or threatening to crack the camera body.

    But that's a bit off-topic. My question is whether this plate I received in Dec. 2009 with the right-angle lip is the mentioned anti-twisting feature? I see lots of references in the forums to installing the camera mounting plate rotated 180 degrees. But with the right-angle lip on this mounting plate, installing it 180-degrees rotated would not seem to be possible. Am I understanding this correctly?

    Thanks,
    Rodney
  9. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #9
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Hong Kong
    Posts: 2,475

    Quote Originally Posted by icysubdweller View Post
    Hi, n00b here, I just got my NN5 w/ RD16 as my xmas present to myself. I'm reading through the forums for info on mounting plates and QR's.

    I wanted to follow up on this thread, as it's now 6 months later. In August, it was mentioned that a new version of the camera mounting plate was 'in the works'.

    The camera mounting plate I received with my NN5 has a small right angle lip on it. This fits my Olympus E-520 body very nicely, although I feel the install is a bit fiddly with the small hex set screw that needs to be adjusted to get the plate at the right offset for my camera body, and which is then inaccessible once the plate is installed. It would be nicer to mount the plate loosely to the body first, then adjust the set screw to position the plate correctly, then tighten both the mounting screw and set screw. It's difficult to get the set screw adjusted so that the lip contacts the body, without worrying that there are unseen forces being applied pulling the plate out of shape or threatening to crack the camera body.

    But that's a bit off-topic. My question is whether this plate I received in Dec. 2009 with the right-angle lip is the mentioned anti-twisting feature? I see lots of references in the forums to installing the camera mounting plate rotated 180 degrees. But with the right-angle lip on this mounting plate, installing it 180-degrees rotated would not seem to be possible. Am I understanding this correctly?

    Thanks,
    Rodney
    yes, the lip the the anti-twisting feature. To rotate the mounting plate by 180 deg, you need to remove and reverse the top plate first.
    you can find the instruction here
    http://nodalninja.com/Manuals/CP2_qrg.pdf



    Nick



    Fanotec
    We listen. We try harder.
  10. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #10

    Thanks Nick, that's what I was looking for. For some reason all the mentions I was finding in the forums about the camera mounting plate went to the URL for the CP1, and that page is now defunct.

    Rodney
  11. Re: Cork vs Rubber - or how to properly fix camera plate

    #11
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Aug 2008
    Location: Netherlands
    Posts: 1,741

    Hi Rodney,

    Yes you are right, a bit tricky to fit the CP-2 to the camera body. Just received my new CP-2 yesterday.

    First of all i took the set apart, to get the two anti twisting top-plates on its own from the base plate. This way you can check the base plate and its desired position to the body more easily and you can check which of the two top plates you need: the one with the long nose or the one with the short nose to reach the camera body.

    Nikon D3 needs the long nose fixed to the back of the body, D200, D90, D3000 the short. Be sure, that everything is square and that the nose touches the body without a gap by looking through from aside against light.

    - Now fix the chosen plate to the body by hand and check the position of the tripod mounting screw position (big yellow one) of the camera body to the top plate. This way you are able to check, which of the two positions of the small silver screw will be reachable when you fix the base plate to the top plate of the CP-2. Plus you can check and decide your position of the base plate to the camera body: long side to the lens or short side to the lens.

    - knowing your positions, refix the chosen top plate to the base plate of the CP2 that way, that the small rubber ring of the silver screw will leave a rest of a possible movement of the top plate to base plate to slip forward and backwards.

    - fix the set to the camera body, fix the tripod mount screw 2/3 to position the base plate to the camera body. Now move the top plate in antitwist position to the camerabody. Fix the top and base plate with your fingers to avoid movement while unsrewing the set with the yellow tripod mounting screw from the body.

    - now do the final fixation by fixing the silver screw tight. Do a final check up on the body.


    With some camera lens combinations you need to change the base plate position from "long side to the lens to short side" position. The theme about the upper rail position of the CP's and turn around 180¬?. To avoid to take the new CP-2 apart "in field", i just bought two CP-2 plates and fixed one in "the long side to the lens position" and one in the short side position.

    So now i can quickly and easily change the plates "on flight" when it is necessary cause of upper rail settings.

    Sounds a bit tricky, i will try to work it out the next days to show what i mean.

    Cheers, and have fun with your new presents.

    Heinz









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