Best economical tripods

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  1. Re: Best economical tripods

    #16

    how abt monopod? anyone can share their experience for using monopod with nn?
    is there any monopod or add-on accessories in that market that can stop it to move out from the same spot when you turn a monopod and shoot? i saw some monopod that comes with 3 extended legs but they are still not stable enough after mounting all pano head and camera equipments.
  2. Re: Best economical tripods

    #17

    Join Date: May 2008
    Location: sunshine coast
    Posts: 21

    all i can say is if you have the dough to spend $400-$900+=[ but spend it as ive bought 3 diferent tripods thinking for $200 you should be able to get something decent that works perfect but to be honest they all suck for doing pano work 1-giottos -1-manfrotto 718 something or rather though i had no intention of using either of them for pano work so i went to my friendly local camera house store for some first rate advice and as you could imagine i went home with something thats not totally ideal but good enough manfrotto 190xpProB great tripod but a bit heavy as i leg it with tents and sleeping gear at times but not that much heavier than carbon but every bit counts when you leg it abit
    though im just a begginer and dont have much coin but if i had it id grab a fancy upperclass gitzo carbon fibre job or similar v though id probably find something i dont like about them either =]
    i rekon the tripod you want needs to be firm/solid and have a good footprint preferably with adjustable legs that open a bit extra as the camera is offset on a pano head and it helps with stability a good solid type shaft so theres not to much movement /wobble when doing 360 stuff and it needs to be able to be packed up nicely and light for lugging it around and wouldnt it be great if it had a spot that fitted your cold beer so you dont spill any on rough ground and a hook on the bottom to hang your bag of cold beers off to help with stability just that bit extra sounds funny coming from a non drinka ha good luck in your search
  3. Re: Best economical tripods

    #18

    I love my Velbon El Carmagne 640. Very, very light. Very stable. Folds very small. And it looks great.
    The El Carmagne 640 is very well made and withstands all the abuse I put it through.

    The price can't be beat!
    Highly recommended.
  4. Re: Best economical tripods

    #19

    Join Date: May 2008
    Location: Alberta, Canada, Eh ?
    Posts: 48

    Here's a good 'economics lesson' about saving a ton of money by getting the right tripod the first time . . Some of it will apply to pano work:

    http://bythom.com/support.htm

    I'm thinking about making up an 'apron support' that allows you to add weight (some may want to use cold beers, as mentioned) to a tripod for stability, similar to the Manfrotto model 166. I'm going to chop up an old cargo net from the minivan.

    I like D_I_Y because it's almost F_R_E_E.




    Edmonton, Canada, Eh ?
  5. Re: Best economical tripods

    #20

    I bought a Benro versatile, the cheaper end aluminium type. It is sturdy enough and the legs can go way out if needed. The only problem I have had is the head is stuck fast :blushing: So my NN3 gets fastened to that. I am thinking of giving it a good whack with a hammer, it will either loosen or break I must admit though that I wish I had gone for the more expensive carbon version for the weight reduction, the one I have can be quite cumbersome at times.

    Ped

    Anyone know of a bag that can take tripod, camera NN3 and a couple of lenses? There doesn't seem to be a lot of choice for that.
  6. Re: Best economical tripods

    #21

    Join Date: May 2008
    Location: Germany, Mainz
    Posts: 7

    Hello,
    I use a Giotto's MT 9170, which is excellent and solid. The legs are made from aluminum tubing. The multi-function center column allows adjustment over 180 degrees from vertical to horizontal. To shot the nadir with this tripod is a pleasure!
    The NN3 is connected to the Giottos tripod with a Newtech 2.5" Quick Release Clamp.
    Cheers, Pepsi

  7. Re: Best economical tripods

    #22

    Quote Originally Posted by asiavr View Post
    I think the tripod head is important too in obtaining a small foot print.

    What do you guys vote for the tripod head? I use both tripod and head from benro but I think their ball head screw was big.
    The head screw also occupied some spaces with the tripod hole in the panorama.
    You don't need a tripod head! I gave up using them. I even hardly use my Fanotec easy leveler.

    Pierre
  8. Re: Best economical tripods

    #23

    Join Date: May 2008
    Location: Germany, Mainz
    Posts: 7


    Pierre: "You don't need a tripod head! I gave up using them."

    This is correct !

    Cheers, Pepsi




  9. Re: Best economical tripods

    #24
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Saddleworth UK
    Posts: 242

    Quote Originally Posted by pgielen View Post
    You don't need a tripod head! I gave up using them. I even hardly use my Fanotec easy leveler.

    Pierre
    That is certainly true when using Manfrotto type clamp lock legs.. It is far less easy with twist lock legs.
    Fortunately I use a Manfrotto 055ProB

    Those with twist lock legs would be better off with a leveller Ike the NN one.
  10. Re: Best economical tripods

    #25

    Join Date: May 2008
    Location: Germany, Mainz
    Posts: 7

    Hello,

    "It is far less easy with twist lock legs."

    Giotto's MT 9170 has clamp lock legs. (see pictures in my posting above)

    Cheers, Pepsi

  11. Re: Best economical tripods

    #26

    Quote Originally Posted by asiavr View Post
    how abt monopod?
    Yes, I have Manfrotto 682B self standing monopod (http://www.manfrotto.com/Jahia/site/manfrotto/pid/2372). I like it because of the small footprint, but of course it is not stable at all. So I only use it with fast shutter speeds (I shoot almost exclusively at f11 so that means bright weather) and when I need a pod that is easy to carry around. The legs help me keep the monopod in position when rotating the NN3. For leveling, I slightly tilt the monopod by hand. Or I don't level the pano at all, because I can still do that afterwards, in Autopano Pro.
  12. Re: Best economical tripods

    #27
    Users Country Flag
    Join Date: Apr 2008
    Location: Bangkok, Thailand
    Posts: 27

    Just got a Benro Travel Angel C169 to go with my NN3, no head. At just over 1.5kg for the whole setup, this is almost perfect for me

    I use a small elastic hair band to wrap the 3 legs at mid section to dampen the vibration and quite happy with the result when using a remote.


  13. Re: Best economical tripods

    #28

    In my experience there is no such thing as a best economical tripod. Almost all of the cheap ones on the market are too flimsy and will not hold even a lightweight camera steady and if there is a breeze blowing then they are next to useless. Centre columns on a tripod, geared or ungeared, just allow more movement and should be avoided. After you buy 3 or 4 cheap tripods you will realise that you could of just bought one good quality one which will give you years of reliable service.

    I have used a Manfrotto 055ProB tripod but never with the column raised. Now I use a Gitzo CF1548 tripod that just has a top plate that the NN3 will mount too and it is rock solid, ocassionally I will use a geared tripod head under the NN3 if I have to position the tripod awkwardy on a slope etc.

    Even tripod mounted we should be looking to minimise any camera movement during a shoot. I would suggest using a cable release as a minimum and if you dont have one that fits your camera you can always use the self timer to minimise camera movement. Mirror lockup is another improvement we can make when taking photographs. This minimises the internal vibration of the camera and improves the detail in the final image.

    and slightly off topic but still relevant, if you don't apply any post processing and then resize and sharpening to your work then you are doing yourself, and any clients, a disservice and it is becomes irrelevant what tripod you use.

    Kev
  14. Re: Best economical tripods

    #29

    Hello Bill,

    The question in the Subject can't be answered properly if the goal is not exactly defined.

    If the goal is to buy a reliable tripod that will give a lot of use for many years than it is not likely that you can buy such device cheap (unless it is a good used model of course).
    And it also depends how much time and efforts you are willing to put in the post processing of the images.

    It is the sum of: Camera+Panohead+Remote controller+Tripod+Workflow+Skills that makes the Sum (output) successful or not.
    The tripod is just a part (although an important part) that makes the sum.

    In time you forget what you paid for your gear but the feeling that you have bought the right piece of equipment will be there the every time you have made a fine panorama.

    I have that feeling when I use my carbon Feisol tripods and my favorite for light travel use is the Feisol Travel CT-3441 tripod.
    With heavy equipment on top of it, legs 50 cm apart from eachother and at a height of 1.85m (my default height with 1 part of the center column erected) I can make easy to stitch panos. For that I only need a individualized template for correcting the Yaw and the Shift params (I call this my EasyStitch method).

    Best,
    Wim.

    EDIT
    Added Feisol travel model
  15. Re: Best economical tripods

    #30

    To be honest, I've always believed that the cheapest tripod is the one that you will always use.

    If a tripod is too slow, or fiddly to extend, use and collapse again, then it tends not to be used. And that's a waste of money. Plus, I and lazy - but I do work hard at it.

    Having said all that, I found one that takes about 3 seconds to put up, and amybe 6 seconds to fold away again. Manfrotto 458B. see it here:- http://www.manfrotto.com/Jahia/site/manfrotto/cache/off/pid/2280?livid=68|69&idx=72

    Now I use it all the time - and THAT's the most economical tripod that I could ever buy.

    I didn't do so well on the Ball head though. I went for the 488RC2 head (similar to the 482, only bigger). I should have got the 322RC2 grip release head.

    Hope this helps.

    David
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