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NN5 set up and working well... one thing concerns me

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  • NN5 set up and working well... one thing concerns me

    Hello all,
    I'm really liking my new (used) NN5 - feels like a Rolls Royce. I have it up - see the pano here, https://we.tl/c0XEimnVN7 a reasonably good stitch, a few vertical errors in the steel shelves and elswhere, but the setup is pretty much bang on.

    The bracket that connects to the base of the camera has to be removed every time you want to take the camera off the NN head. This would be fine, but the problem is, there is no way to know that you are screwing this into the camera completely square! Which means the camera may be tilted up or down a bit on a different axis from the point the upper arm rotates (in line with the nodal point)

    Surely this is a bit of a problem, or is 1 or 2 on this axis minimal?

    Tx
    Mark.
    WeTransfer is the simplest way to send your files around the world

  • #2
    I use a quick release adapter for mounting the camera. It happens to be a Manfrotto type, which enables the camera to be also mounted on a tripod with a compatible pan/tilt head, but there are many others available including Fanotec ones.

    John

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi John,
      Thanks for the response.

      I did have a look at some quick release mechanisms a while ago, but the question remains, each time you put the one half of the quick release mechanism onto the camera, what guarantee is there that it will be square with the camera.
      Also, when you connect the camera half to the pano head half, it seems that some of the quick release mechanisms did not have a stop plate, so you'd be guessing where the correct position is.

      How do you deal with these two issues?

      Cheers
      Mark.

      Originally posted by John Houghton View Post
      I use a quick release adapter for mounting the camera. It happens to be a Manfrotto type, which enables the camera to be also mounted on a tripod with a compatible pan/tilt head, but there are many others available including Fanotec ones.

      John

      Comment


      • #4
        Mark, The two problems are dealt with fairly easily:

        1. Don't use a QR adapter that does not have a stop plate/pin.
        2. I leave the adapter plate on the camera all the time.

        John

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi John
          1/ trouble is, they don't mention a stop pin in the item description (from what I've seen, anyway)
          2/ That won't work, I use my camera for street photography and also for video work using a cage. The plate would have to be removed for both these activities.

          Odd that the NN5, off the bat, does not have a failsafe way to mount the camera square each time. I suppose I must get a small T Square to put in my kit :)

          Cheers
          Mark.

          Originally posted by John Houghton View Post
          Mark, The two problems are dealt with fairly easily:

          1. Don't use a QR adapter that does not have a stop plate/pin.
          2. I leave the adapter plate on the camera all the time.

          John

          Comment


          • #6
            Would a camera plate be a solution for you: http://shop.nodalninja.com/collectio...e-ii-cp2-f2109 ?

            John

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi
              Well, it is very similar to what already exists on the NN5 bracket I bought, perhaps I have the earlier version of this camera plate, but if you use the adjust the position flange so that it is flush with the back of the camera, it presses against the flip up monitor at the back of the camera... I'm not sure any pressure on a monitor is good, but i guess seeing it is parallel is much easier if there is a tiny 0.5mm gap between flange and camera monitor, so may be worth trying to get it as close as possible.

              Thinking about it, and you, im sure will have something to say about it, it seems to me that IF the camera was not 100% square with the bracket, and was, say 1 or 2 degrees off, the effect is primarily the lens moving vertically up or down, as the nodal point is a long way from the 1/4 inch screw on the camera plate... and the vertical movement is not a problem (I think) it is more the lateral distance, the camera moving forward and backwards that makes a difference. So, of course the camera does move back a tiny bit when the camera plate is not 100% square with the camera, but my thoughts are that 1 rotation is going to make a TINY difference in moving the camera back maybe 0.25mm or less?

              Just thoughts!!

              Cheers
              Mark

              Originally posted by John Houghton View Post
              Would a camera plate be a solution for you: http://shop.nodalninja.com/collectio...e-ii-cp2-f2109 ?

              John

              Comment


              • #8
                The effect of the camera not being mounted square to the bracket will vary according to the focal length of the lens and whether you are shooting single row or multi row. For a single row panorama, a vertical offset of the entrance pupil (not the nodal point, please) is of little importance. For multi row (which includes single row + nadir and zenith), then the vertical offset will have more effect. The maximum effect will be if you take two nadir shots, rotating the head around by 180 degrees between them (as I often do). The parallax shift is then double the entrance pupil offset. I did a test with a 15mm fisheye on a fullframe camera, shooting 6 around, 1 up and two down. I did this once with the head set up correctly, and then a second time with the entrance pupil vertically offset by 1mm (which corresponds to a 0.8 degree rotational offset, approximately). Stitching with PTGui, both stitches were satisfactory, but the average control point distances were 0.68 and 0.98 respectively. This is but one test and not particularly accurate at that, but the results are in line with what I would expect.

                When doing the tests, I did occur to me that if you want a quick check that the camera is properly mounted on the arm, you might simply measure the distance from the bottom rail to the centre of a lens cap fitted on the lens. Do this with the entrance pupil accurately positioned, and then use that measurement to check the lens whenever you remount the camera on the arm.

                John

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi
                  Yeah,good idea about simply measuring.
                  Also, I am doing a single row, and my 12mm samyang is physically quite long, (it seems the longer the lens physically, the smaller the distance the lens moves back when 1 or 2 off square with the mount.
                  EDIT Actually no, that does not make sense, if the lens was 100km long and you moved 1, it would be many meters back...I guess what is true is the longer the lens physically, the more accurate a ruler check would be!

                  Thanks John
                  Mark.

                  Originally posted by John Houghton View Post
                  The effect of the camera not being mounted square to the bracket will vary according to the focal length of the lens and whether you are shooting single row or multi row. ...............
                  ....if you want a quick check that the camera is properly mounted on the arm, you might simply measure the distance from the bottom rail to the centre of a lens cap fitted on the lens. Do this with the entrance pupil accurately positioned, and then use that measurement to check the lens whenever you remount the camera on the arm.
                  Last edited by markpalmos; 02-22-2017, 10:50 AM.

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