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Revised version of the tutorial "How to make a spherical 3D panorama with a single camera and a fisheye lens"

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  • #16
    Hello,

    I did one more test to make a spherical 3D panorama with a single camera.

    For this one I did 50 shots per each panorama. I think it gave me better stereo effect.

    http://www.arbitphoto.com/MPS_3D/tour.html


    Best,
    Gregory

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    • #17
      Originally posted by GregoryA View Post
      . . . For this one I did 50 shots per each panorama. I think it gave me better stereo effect.

      http://www.arbitphoto.com/MPS_3D/tour.html . . .
      Gregory,

      That is a nice 3D tour, the result is very good.

      Btw, it is not the number of images that makes the 3D effect but the amount of forward shift out of NPP of the lens.

      Shooting more images is better because this reduce the parallax errors that are always present when shooting images out of NPP.
      F.e. when shooting a 3D pano with a normal number of 6 images for the round shots you could easily get control point errors of 40 px between the images, the resulting 3D pano would be awful to look at, especially close to zenith and nadir.
      When shooting 10 times more images (60 instead of 6) the parallax error between the images is also 10 times reduced so instead of 40 px the CP errors are 4 px and this is often acceptable.
      More images will almost(*) always give a better result so when in doubt how many images are needed you better shoot the highest number of images you can shoot and process.

      (*) When shooting a 3D pano outside you often will take less images then optimum to speed up the shooting time, this will reduce the chance that objects will move in the scene (in an ideal situation objects are "frozen" when shooting a 3D pano with a single camera).

      Wim
      Last edited by Wim.Koornneef; 04-01-2014, 05:44 AM.

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      • #18
        Hello Wim!

        Thank you for taking the time to reply.
        You are right, I did 50 shots and I managed to move my camera 2cm forward, compare to my first try.
        So next time, I will try to shift little be more.

        Best regards,
        Gregory

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        • #19
          Hello Gregory,

          This looks really good to me so I feel that you have got a good solution that looks real so I think that if you try and increase the 3D more you may possibly go too far.

          All the best, Hugh.

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          • #20
            A little kick :)

            I intend to shoot 3D panoramas of house interiors myself, and I've read this complete thread.

            If I understand correctly for objects which are 1 meter away, the lens shift would ideally be 4cm and you have to shoot 50 photos instead of 25.

            However, what I dont completely understand is do I need 2 panoramas of 50 photos = 100 photos for stereo 3D?

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            • #21
              You make a single rotation with 50 photos. Then you use left/ right portion of images to make a stereo pair of panos.

              Nick
              Fanotec
              We listen. We try harder.

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              • #22
                Can someone please elaborate a bit more on step 4? Maybe make a short video about step 4? I'm struggling to understand this part of the tutorial.

                Thanks!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Tevvie View Post
                  Can someone please elaborate a bit more on step 4? Maybe make a short video about step 4? I'm struggling to understand this part of the tutorial.

                  Thanks!
                  This is for a single lens setup with large number of shots to reduce parallax. It is different for 2 lens setup or 2 stereo pano pairs with offset.
                  Basically, you need the ideal lens parameter from a pano where the lens is at the no parallax point. Then you apply these parameters from a template and fix them. During stitching of stereo panos, only optimize other parameters such as yaw, pitch, roll, d, e, view point.

                  Nick
                  Fanotec
                  We listen. We try harder.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by nick fan View Post
                    This is for a single lens setup with large number of shots to reduce parallax. It is different for 2 lens setup or 2 stereo pano pairs with offset.
                    Basically, you need the ideal lens parameter from a pano where the lens is at the no parallax point. Then you apply these parameters from a template and fix them. During stitching of stereo panos, only optimize other parameters such as yaw, pitch, roll, d, e, view point.

                    Nick
                    Thanks Nick, but I prefer the method of DorinDXN. As a beginner I find it sad that everyone skips the PTGui part in their tutorial.

                    I understand the basics of PTGui and panorama photography, but I want to take it a step further and shoot stereoscopic panoramas.

                    Fortunately, DorinDXN will write a new tutorial. His tutorials are understandable for beginners.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by nick fan View Post
                      This is for a single lens setup with large number of shots to reduce parallax. It is different for 2 lens setup or 2 stereo pano pairs with offset.
                      Basically, you need the ideal lens parameter from a pano where the lens is at the no parallax point. Then you apply these parameters from a template and fix them. During stitching of stereo panos, only optimize other parameters such as yaw, pitch, roll, d, e, view point.

                      Nick
                      Hi,

                      I want to give the tutorial of Wim another chance.

                      I'm still struggling with step 4 of the tutorial

                      Optimize for lens shift parameters "d" and "e" and image parameters yaw, pitch and roll in steps with linked roll and pitch for all images and remove all cp's with errors of 8 px or higher.
                      Avoid optimizing for the image parameter pitch and the vertical lens shift parameter "e" in the same step when you start optimizing as it will give issues with high and wrong values.
                      When the cp errors are all below 8 px and the pitch and the vertical lens shift parameter are more or less normal then the optimizing is done.
                      I'm going to try to explain it in my own words, maybe someone can state if it's correct or not.

                      1. In the Optimizer tab select Yaw, Pitch and Roll checkboxes of ALL images in the middle part.
                      2. Also select the Link roll and Link pitch checkboxes
                      3. Select Field of View, a (lens distortion), b (lens distortion), c (lens distortion), Horizontal shift (d), and Vertical shift (e) in the left pane
                      3. Hit Run Optimizer button
                      4. In the Control Point Table remove CPs with errors of 8px or higher

                      So what I don't understand is:

                      Avoid optimizing for the image parameter pitch and the vertical lens shift parameter "e" in the same step when you start optimizing...
                      Does this mean that I first need to deselect Vertical shift (e) and keep pitch selected and Optimize and then deselect pitch for ALL images and select Vertical shift (e) and Optimize again?

                      and

                      ...and the pitch and the vertical lens shift parameter are more or less normal...
                      What does normal mean?

                      I've read the help page of PTGui like 10 times :) ...

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