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View Full Version : Exposure for pano's



Jake
06-14-2009, 01:38 PM
I set the camera to manual mode, and the white balance to sun light setting, for outdoors..... I take the 6 pano shots around and 1Z and 1N. Is this the correct way to achieve consistent exposure or am I missing something. For example, the 1Z may be directly facing the sun and be over exposed, so how do I compensate for this to get smooth exposure stitching?

John Houghton
06-15-2009, 01:24 AM
You may not be able to accommodate the full dynamic range of the scene using a single exposure for all the shots. Nevertheless, that's what you should do if you want easy blending. Use the camera's AEB feature( Auto Exposure Bracketing) to take sets of shots with a range of exposures. These can be stitched to a set of panoramas for each exposure setting that can then be blended together using HDR software (High Dynamic Range), Fusion software (Enfuse, TuFuse etc.), or blend the sets together manually in Photoshop.

John

Jake
06-15-2009, 01:50 AM
Thanks John, but if I use Auto bracketing and take say three shots x6 around and then 3x Z and N I'll have so many pictures that it will crash the computer. There must be a simpler way to do it than that surly?

John Houghton
06-15-2009, 06:04 AM
There's no reason why you should crash the computer. A program like PTGui can manage with a small memory but it just takes longer. PC memory is not expensive these days, so it's worth installing as much as you can. I took this panorama a couple of weeks ago, and the subject has an extremely wide dynamic range. It's made from 62 shots (three sets bracketed at -2, 0, +2):

http://www.johnhpanos.com/oldwarch.htm

Even the bracketed images were not up to rendering the stained glass windows adequately. I returned to the church a week later and took some handheld shots of the windows for pasting into the final panorama after warping them with the Viewpoint feature.

John

riefa
06-15-2009, 07:10 AM
I took this panorama a couple of weeks ago, and the subject has an extremely wide dynamic range. It's made from 62 shots (three sets bracketed at -2, 0, +2):

http://www.johnhpanos.com/oldwarch.htm

Even the bracketed images were not up to rendering the stained glass windows adequately. I returned to the church a week later and took some handheld shots of the windows for pasting into the final panorama after warping them with the Viewpoint feature.

John


John, for this panorama, do you use the internal PTGui HDR / fusion feature, or not? If yes, what software?

I've tried to do some fusion using PTGui exposure fusion but so far could not achieve a good result. Thanks.

Riefa

John Houghton
06-15-2009, 10:20 AM
Riefa, No special software was used on that panorama. In addition to the wide dynamic range, I had to cope with lighting of three different colour temperatures. I basically generated the three blend planes in PTGui but merged them in Photoshop manually.

John