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Serhan
02-01-2009, 02:51 PM
Hi Everyone,

Here is my first pano; http://fethiyeholidayvillas.co.uk/pano.html

I couldnt take photo for sky and ground also I dont know how to create 360*180...
Could anyone please give me a source(link) to read about create 360x180 panos and use NN5L..?

Equipment:

NN5L
Manfrotto 055XPROB
Canon 5D
Canon 20-105mm IS USM L

Serhan

nick fan
02-01-2009, 06:52 PM
nice cylindrical pano. The spherical is the same. Just add a few rows.

here is the setting for 20mm lens.

Canon EF 20mm

* Full frame=20mm, HFOV: 84? | VFOV: 62? | DFOV: 94?
*
Min. shots (full frame): Nadir, 8 images every 45? at -60? pitch, 8 images every 45? at 0? pitch, 8 images every 45? at +60? pitch, Zenith




nick

Serhan
02-02-2009, 05:33 AM
Hi Nick,

Thanks for your answer.

I had a mistake; my lens 24-105mm

Also could you please advise to create 360*180 pano on PTGui..?

Thanks,
Serhan

John Houghton
02-02-2009, 07:27 AM
For 24mm, you could take: Nadir, 10 images every 36? at -25? pitch, 10 images every 36? at +25? pitch, Zenith - 22 shots in total.

It is quite straightforward to stitch a 360x180 panorama. It's not really any different to the single row 360 degree panorama that you have already done. PTGui effectively does all its stitching on a 360x180 degree surface, i.e. a sphere. Set the output projection to equirectangular and the angle of view to be 360 x180 and you will see the whole of this area in the Panorama Editor window. If you then proceed to generate the output panorama, you will get the full view that you need.

PTGui doesn't have any notion of rows and columns. It just assembles the images based upon matching features in the areas where the images overlap. All you have to do is take care to provide a reasonable overlap between adjacent images and make sure that every part of the entire view is captured by your shots. This is assured by taking the shots at the settings suggested above.

John

DaveT
02-12-2009, 08:21 PM
John, how did you calculate the +25 and -25 degree pitch for the 24mm lens example? I'm new to this, but I can't seem to find the pitch calculation in the on-line calculators. Is there a formula, or do you have a link to a good calculator that provides both the horizontal as well as the pitch values? (Same question for Nick on the 20mm example) Thank you!!

Dave T

John Houghton
02-13-2009, 01:25 AM
Dave, you don't need a calculator. You can simulate a trial shoot in the Panorama Editor window as follows:

1. Add several images from your camera into PTGui. The lens used to shoot them is unimportant, but have them in the same orientation that you intend to use for the real images.
2. Switch into Advanced mode via the button on the right of the Project Assistant.
3. Select the Lens details tab and enter the lens type, focal length and crop factor to be simulated.
4. Display the Panorama editor window and click the Fit Image icon. Note the images' horizontal and vertical fov at the bottom.
5. Select Spherical 360x180 from the Projection menu. All the images will be in a pile in the middle (since yaw, pitch & roll of all the images is 0).
6. Click on the Edit Individual Images icon (2nd from the left).

You can now drag individual images into rows to try out different arrangements of images. To speed this process up, go to the Image Parameters tab. Select the yaw boxes of a group of images and click on Fill Yaw at the bottom to place them evenly spaced in a row. Select the pitch boxes for the same set of images and set the pitch. Do the same for other rows. And/or you can simply enter yaw and pitch values manually. When you drag images into position manually, you can read out their yaw and pitch values here. Note that you can hide images temporarily by unchecking the boxes in the Include Images list on the Create Panorama tab.

In this way you can quickly see what works and what doesn't by checking the amount of overlap, which will often vary along the image edges.

John

nick fan
02-13-2009, 02:06 AM
John, how did you calculate the +25 and -25 degree pitch for the 24mm lens example? I'm new to this, but I can't seem to find the pitch calculation in the on-line calculators. Is there a formula, or do you have a link to a good calculator that provides both the horizontal as well as the pitch values? (Same question for Nick on the 20mm example) Thank you!!

Dave T


I just quote from database for popular lens for spherical panography. They are optimized by many users.
www.vrwave.com
You won't find the 24mm setting. However, you can find setting for wider lens on cropped sensor.
24mm (35mm eq) is 16mm on 1.5x sensor and 15mm on 1.6x sensor. Don't confuse a rectilinear lens with a fisheye lens. A fisheye lens has wider angle of view.
You will only find this setting that match with your lens.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sigma 15-30mm f/3.5-4.5 EX DG

* Full frame=15-30mm, HFOV: 100? - 62? | VFOV: 77? - 44? | DFOV: 111? - 72?
* 1.3x=19.5-39mm, HFOV: 85? - 50? | VFOV: 63? - 34? | DFOV: 96? - 58?
* 1.5x=22.5-45mm, HFOV: 77? - 44? | VFOV: 56? - 30? | DFOV: 88? - 51?
* 1.6x=24-48mm, HFOV: 74? - 41? | VFOV: 53? - 28? | DFOV: 84? - 49?
* 1.7x=25.5-51mm, HFOV: 70? - 39? | VFOV: 50? - 26? | DFOV: 81? - 46?

*
Min. shots (full frame): N, 6 images every 60? at -30? pitch, 6 images every 60? at +30? pitch, Z
*
Min. shots (1.3x): N, 8 images every 45? at -30? pitch, 8 images every 45? at +30? pitch, Z
*
Min. shots (1.5x, 1.6x, 1.7x): N, 8 images every 45? at -60? pitch, 8 images every 45? at 0? pitch, 8 images every 45? at +60? pitch, Z
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

so the recommedned setting for 24mm on FF is N, 8 images every 45? at -60? pitch, 8 images every 45? at 0? pitch, 8 images every 45? at +60? pitch, Z. where N is nadir (-90 deg shot) and Z is zenith (+90 deg shot). Totally 26 shots.
John's setting is further optimised bying using dummy images in PTGUI. I am afraid that the overlaps at the upper and lower seams are a bit too thin. Overlap is just (74-65)/74=12%. But it does save you 4 shots.


nick

DaveT
02-13-2009, 09:54 AM
John and Nick,

Thank you so much for the quick and thorough replies ! Very much appreciated .

Dave