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shadow
04-15-2008, 07:15 AM
Question for those on the forum or those with more experience than I.

I have been using the Nodal Ninja 3 and it really makes life easier when doing multi image stitching. I recently purchased the EZ Leveling base (This makes life much easier) and have been using it.

here is my question. Is it better to level the rig in between each shot or level one and rotate around it (what I have been doing with reasonable results)?

here is a sample, of a construction project we are working on. It is a single row stitch. Used a Sigma 10-20mm @ 10mm, 15 images, one every 15 degrees. Stitched in Auto stitch. I aimed at the center point and leveled the NN3 using the easy leveling device provided by fanotec and rotated it around without re-leveling.


http://bbqpeople.net/bbqpeople/images/East180.jpg

Bill Bailey
04-15-2008, 08:22 AM
Hi Shadow,
Welcome to the forum.
The spirit levels on NN3 and NN5 are extremely sensitive. A "little" bubble drift is normal between shots. In setting things up level once, rotate 180 and level again (looking for the happy medium which shouldn't be much) and just shoot your pano. You'll be fine. Also, and some may or may not agree, using multiple levels is not recommended (like trying to stack marbles). If using multiple levels the important one would be the one on NN.
Cheers
Bill

nick fan
04-15-2008, 09:12 AM
Hi Shadow,

you just need to level the first shot. re-leveling changes the relative position of the stuff above the leveler (and hence the NPP) and should be avoided. In fact you just need to get the leveling about right. Our eyes are not as sensitive as the spirit level on NN. :wink:

nick

shadow
04-15-2008, 11:09 AM
Thanks Guys.

Buy the way the easy leveler is probably the most helpful piece I have picked up to help get these right.

now I'm considering a fisheye lens.......

Just spending more and more money.

Bill Bailey
04-15-2008, 11:45 AM
A great lens is the Sigma 8mm f3.5.

pep
04-21-2008, 05:52 AM
Shadow,

Even Autostitch can correct leveling if you keep the bubble around the circle during the move. As Nick said, eyes are not sensitive enough to detect such default.
Leveling base is really helpful for multi row and high definition pano, where you have to be really picky. For other situation, it helps you to make your pano straight and facilitate stitching but don't worry if the bubble move inside or on the circle ... stitching will correct.

PEP

rjacobs
04-21-2008, 11:21 AM
I was using my NN5L today and had quite a bit of drift from what I set as level in a 120 degree pano. No Matter what I tried the bubble would not stay as I originally set it. :confused1: Why is that?

Thanks.

Richard

Bill Bailey
04-21-2008, 11:39 AM
I was using my NN5L today and had quite a bit of drift from what I set as level in a 120 degree pano. No Matter what I tried the bubble would not stay as I originally set it. :confused1: Why is that?
Thanks. Richard

Hi Richard, The bubble level is extremely sensitive - maybe to much so. It's difficult to obtain a true and exacting level so some drift is likely. As long as the drift isn't excessive you should be able to find a happy medium. If the drift is excessive and effecting the panos I would be happy to swap it out for you. Touch basis with me - bill[at]nodalninja[dot]com if you need the exchange.
Thanks
Bill

rjacobs
04-21-2008, 11:52 AM
Hi Bill,

It might be something I did. Or it might be what I saw wasn't that excessive. I won't know until I see how the panos turn out. Thanks for the offer though.

Again, I really like the way the NN5L works. Glad I upgraded.

Richard

bigwade
04-22-2008, 05:35 PM
Use a good tripod.......:-)
Most centre colums like Manfrotto have flex...... :-(

Gitzo and Feisol are good tripods for panoramic images.

Ewie_nz
04-22-2008, 09:28 PM
Use a good tripod.......:-)
Most centre colums like Manfrotto have flex...... :-(

Gitzo and Feisol are good tripods for panoramic images.


A good solid tripod is a must for pano's, I use a Manfrotto 055D which is a centre column and very stable.

IMO you need to decide which is more important, stability or weight. If you prefer a light tripod then I suggest using it at a lower height to improve stability. If you need the height, then construction becomes critical. I often hang a photobag off the bottom of the centre column which adds weight and therefore stability.

I used to use a Slick tripod which was very good and I thought, stable. However when I switched to my (much) more robust Manfrotto, I was amazed at the extra sharpness I was getting in my images.
A remote trigger also reduces the risk of movement and improves image quality, day or night.

To quote Bill Fortney "there are two kinds of tripods; those that are light and easy to carry, and good ones." (exceprt www.photoshopinsider.com)

Cheers

Ewie